aleator classicus

Reading at Random in Classical Literature

Homer, Odyssey 8.186-193

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Odysseus sets a new Phaeacian record for the discus.

ἦ ῥα, καὶ αὐτῷ φάρει ἀναΐξας λάβε δίσκον
μείζονα καὶ πάχετον, στιβαρώτερον οὐκ ὀλίγον περ
ἢ οἵῳ Φαίηκες ἐδίσκεον ἀλλήλοισι.
τόν ῥα περιστρέψας ἧκε στιβαρῆς ἀπὸ χειρός·
βόμβησεν δὲ λίθος· κατὰ δ’ ἔπτηξαν ποτὶ γαίῃ
Φαίηκες δολιχήρετμοι, ναυσικλυτοὶ ἄνδρες,
λᾶος ὑπὸ ῥιπῆς· ὁ δ’ ὑπέρπτατο σήματα πάντων,
ῥίμφα θέων ἀπὸ χειρός.

He spoke, and, jumping up with his cloak around him, he took a bigger discus, thicker and no small amount bulkier than those the Phaeacians used among themselves. Spinning around he sent it from his sturdy hand. And the stone hummed; the Phaeacians of the long oars crouched down to the ground, men renowned for their ships, beneath the stone’s rush. It flew past the marks of all the others, flying lightly from his hand.

Written by aleatorclassicus

September 21, 2012 at 12:00 PM

Posted in Homer

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