aleator classicus

Reading at Random in Classical Literature

Tacitus, Annals 14.17

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Rioting, and the political response to it, in AD 59.

sub idem tempus levi initio atrox caedes orta inter colonos Nucerinos Pompeianosque gladiatorio spectaculo, quod Livineius Regulus, quem motum senatu rettuli, edebat. quippe oppidana lascivia in vicem incessentes probra, dein saxa, postremo ferrum sumpsere, validiore Pompeianorum plebe, apud quos spectaculum edebatur. ergo deportati sunt in urbem multi e Nucerinis trunco per vulnera corpore, ac plerique liberorum aut parentum mortes deflebant. cuius rei iudicium princeps senatui, senatus consulibus permisit. et rursus re ad patres relata, prohibiti publice in decem annos eius modi coetu Pompeiani collegiaque, quae contra leges instituerant, dissoluta; Livineius et qui alii seditionem conciverant exilio multati sunt.

At the same time, among the people of Nuceria and Pompeii, dreadful bloodshed originated from a trivial beginning at a gladiatorial show which Livineius Regulus (who, as I have said, was expelled from the Senate) was putting on. Casting abuse at each other, in the way that people in country towns tend to do, they took up insults, then rocks, and finally swords. The people of Pompeii, in whose city the show was taking place, were the stronger. Thus many of the Nucerians, their bodies maimed with wounds, were brought to Rome, and many bewailed  the deaths of their children or parents. The emperor [Nero] entrusted the trial of this matter to the Senate, and the Senate entrusted it to the consuls. When it was referred back to the Senate [i.e. after the consuls had investigated], the Pompeians were forbidden from holding any public gathering of this sort for ten years, and the associations which they had created contrary to the laws were dissolved. Livineius and the others who had provoked the discord were punished with exile.

Written by aleatorclassicus

August 13, 2011 at 12:00 PM

Posted in Tacitus

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